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ERIC Number: ED239905
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983
Pages: 17
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-951-44-1471-3
Arithmetical Processes and Strategies: Their Relationship with Study Achievement, Motivation and Attitudes = Aritmeettiset Prosessit ja Strategiat: Yhteydet Matematiikan Opintomenestykseen, Opiskelumotivaatioon ja Asenteisiin. Tampereen Yliopiston Hameenlinnan Opettajankoulutuslaitos. Julkaisu No. 10.
Keranto, Tapio
Three factors associated with arithmetical processes (sequence skills, arithmetical strategies, and information processing capacity) were measured in individual interviews with 35 first-grade pupils, aged 7.6 to 8.6, in one Finnish school. Mathematics achievement was determined from information supplied by teachers. Attitudes were assessed twice, with a 3-day interval, for 67 first and second graders. The findings are presented with discussion. Counting skills showed extremely significant development during the year. Pupils made an extremely significant transfer from the use of external aids to the use of mental strategies, but evidence was found to support the view that external aids are significant and indispensible in the learning and teaching of mathematics. The development of information processing capacity was also extremely significant. Sequence skills and arithmetical strategies accounted for 52% to 59% of the variance on the various components of mathematics achievement. Interrelationships of skills were found. Attitude measures were more valid as age and academic ability increased. A lengthy list of references is included with this English summary. (MNS)
Univ. of Tampere, Dept. of Teacher Training in HML, Erottajakatu 12, 13130 HML 13, Finland.
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Tampere Univ., Hameelinna (Finland). Dept. of Teaching Training.
Identifiers: Finland; Mathematics Education Research
Note: A condensed English summary of the original Finnish study.