NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED238777
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Nov
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Principals' and Social Studies Teachers' Perceptions of the High School Social Studies Curriculum in Mississippi.
Madison, Ernestine N.; Sistrunk, Walter E.
Concern among Mississippi educators about the definition, scope, and future role of high school social studies led to a statewide survey of high school principals' and social studies teachers' opinions and recommendations. A total of 150 principals and 300 teachers, chosen randomly, answered a 55-item High School Social Studies Curriculum Opinionnaire adapted from National Council for the Social Studies Guidelines to determine perceptions of existing and desirable high school social studies curricula. Mean scores were computed for each item and existing and desirable curricula compared. An analysis of the data indicated the need to improve existing curricula. While no significant difference was recorded in mean perceptions of principals and teachers of the existing curriculum, there were significant differences in teachers' and principals' perceptions of desired curricula. Principals felt that the desired curriculum should emphasize greater cross-cultural contact, greater participation in the real world, utilization of community resources, more specific objectives, and more concept-based study. Teachers' desired changes focused on obtaining more appropriate instructional materials and facilities, greater academic freedom, and increased teacher participation in professional activities. A similar study analyzing students' and administrators' perceptions was recommended. (LP)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Mississippi
Note: Paper presented at the Mid-South Educational Research Association Conference (Nashville, TN, November, 1983).