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ERIC Number: ED238750
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981
Pages: 135
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Hopping into Economics: First Graders Learn about Economics through an Easter Theme.
Davis, Gaylene
A 3-month study unit introducing first grade students to economics through an Easter theme is outlined in five sections. Sections 1 and 2 describe rationale, goals, and learning objectives. Section 3 provides learning activities. A wide range of instructional strategies is used to teach the basic economic concepts of want, need, scarcity, inflation, goods and services, division of labor, and economic interdependence around the framework of Easter preparation. Bulletin boards, an Easter wish book, economic riddles, and Easter stories introduce students to wants and needs. Adaptations of games such as musical chairs present the idea of scarcity, and supply and demand. Creating murals and baking cookies and bread are used to convey the concepts of goods and services, division of labor, interdependence, and production and consumption. Students also practice economic problem-solving through applications of a 5-step decision-making process. In section 4, the overall project is evaluated. Section 5, a bibliography, includes audiovisual and print resources, games, and free materials. A separate section contains copies of all written class activities, including stories, worksheets, tests, puzzles, and a coloring book. (LP)
National Depository for Economic Education Awards, Milner 184, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61761 (free).
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher; Reports - Descriptive; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Teachers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Jonesboro School District 1, AR.
Identifiers: Easter; Holidays; Interdependence
Note: Paper prepared at North Elementary School for the International Paper Company Foundation's 20th Annual National Awards Program for the Teaching of Economics (1981-1982). Examples of student work may not reproduce clearly.