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ERIC Number: ED238400
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Aug
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Sex Differences in Computer Access, Interest and Usage.
Miura, Irene; Hess, Robert D.
Three studies give evidence to support informal reports of sex differences in computer access, interest, and use in the school-aged population. In the first study, a survey of 87 middle and upper income students in grades 5 to 8 revealed that more boys than girls owned home microcomputers and that use of the home computer also differed by gender. In the second study, questionnaires were sent to directors of summer camps and classes that offered training in programming for microcomputers. Data supplied by 23 camp directors on 5,533 students indicated that enrollment in such camps and classes showed a pattern of three to one in favor of boys. The ratio of boys to girls increased with level of course difficulty and cost of session. In a third study, 157 middle school students from 3 school districts located in lower, middle, and upper income areas were asked to rate a list of 75 software titles for perceived user interest. Results indicated that a significantly greater number of the titles, which were randomly selected from a list developed for three major microcomputer manufacturers, were perceived as primarily suited for male audiences. A bibliography and supporting data are attached. (Author/LMM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Computer Camps
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (91st, Anaheim, CA, August 26-30, 1983).