NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED238246
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Mar
Pages: 56
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
English for the Health Sciences: Special Projects Report.
Gray-Richards, Barbara; Kirley, Elizabeth
A study assessing the need for English instruction to increase the proficiency of nonnative speakers taking licensing examinations in 24 health sciences in British Columbia is described. Ten areas of study are reported: groups of potential learners, language screening used before the licensing examinations, why nonnative speakers fail the licensing examinations, the finding of general rather than technical language deficiencies, statistics about the licensing examinations, suggested resources for upgrading the skills of failed candidates, the interest of licensing bodies in language instruction, sources of space and funding, a survey of training institutions, and interviews with failed candidates. Recommendations are that: (1) a curriculum be developed and tested in a pilot program, (2) licensing bodies keep records on nonnative speakers applying for licensure, (3) closer liaison be established between licensing bodies and institutions offering such testing and upgrading facilities, (4) institutions offering health sciences programs test oral and written English proficiency of candidates, (5) these tests distinguish proficiencies in general and technical language, (6) records of Vancouver Community College's English Language Assessment candidates be reviewed to assist those planning careers in the health sciences, and (7) licensing boards consider pre-immigration language evaluation. (MSE)
Vancouver Community College, King Edward Campus, 1155 E. Broadway, Box 24620, Station C, Vancouver, British Columbia V5T 4N3
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria. Continuing Education Div.
Authoring Institution: Vancouver Community Coll., British Columbia.
Identifiers: British Columbia