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ERIC Number: ED238127
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Aug
Pages: 308
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Reform of Reaction? An Experimental Analysis of the Effectiveness of "Power-Based" Strategies for Eliminating Sex Bias in California Schools. A Report.
McDonald, Scott C.
By means of a literature search and data from the California Coalition for Sex Equity in Education (CCSEE) questionnaire (the Title IX Implementation Assessment Instrument), this report presents the findings a 2-year (1978-80) study of sex bias and Title IX compliance in California at 23 experimental and 13 control school districts. The report involves fundamental questions of evaluation, measurement, and other processes and prior factors concerning Title IX compliance. Stratification variables were socioeconomic status and ethnicity. Interview data provided the dependent variable in the study. Measurement control variables included demographic, fiscal, legal, and organizational variables. The report concludes: (1) that federal programs to reduce sex bias in schools produce many of the intended results; (2) that institutional change regarding Title IX can be measured by a valid and reliable quantified/scaling procedure; and (3) that among the factors affecting the success of compliance efforts are demographic factors (such as size and location of the school district) and the degree of involvement of the superintendent or assistant superintendent. Numerous tables and figures provide the CCSEE Title IX implementation instrument and pre- and posttreatment raw frequencies of response and posttreatment scale-item correlations. (PB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Numerical/Quantitative Data
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: Women's Educational Equity Act Program (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: California Coalition for Sex Equity in Education.
Identifiers: California; Title IX Education Amendments 1972
Note: Tables, figures and correlations may not reproduce clearly due to small print.