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ERIC Number: ED238071
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Nov
Pages: 36
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Nonverbal Behaviors within Communicator Style as Possible Predictors of Hireability in Employment Interviews.
Sampugnaro, Vincent J.; And Others
A study was conducted to identify the nonverbal behaviors predicting hireability, as well as the nonverbal behaviors candidates employ that predict hireability. Subjects were 25 campus recruiters, each of whom was given a cover letter explaining the purpose of the study and three copies of a Likert-type questionnaire on a single communicator style--either openness, friendliness, attentiveness, or preciseness. After completing an interview, recruiters were instructed to indicate on the scale to what extent a candidate displayed certain nonverbal characteristics. Twenty-two variables were used: the four communicator styles, hireability, and 17 nonverbal behaviors. Results indicated that to be perceived as hireable, a candidate should (1) use good posture, (2) nod head to indicate attentiveness, (3) lean toward the interviewer, (4) enunciate clearly, (5) have good facial expression, (6) maintain good eye contact, (7) be neatly groomed, (8) talk with an animated style, (9) use hand gestures, (10) have vocal variety, and (11) avoid fidgeting. Another finding was that coordinated clothing was a necessary but not a sufficient condition for being considered hireable. It was also noted that candidates could be perceived as facially expressive, smiling, and friendly without being considered hireable. Finally, the style dimension of openness and the nonverbal behaviors associated with it were found to be strong predictors of hireability. (A sample cover letter and test instruments are appended.) (HOD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Communicator Style
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Speech Communication Association (69th, Washington, DC, November 10-13, 1983).