NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED237657
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Dec-1
Pages: 36
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Design and Implementation of an Urban Adult Basic Education Program.
Samuels, Frank; Gierach, Lester
It has been estimated that about 10 percent of the total United States population, some 23 million American adults, are functionally illiterate. About 100,000 of these persons live in the Milwaukee area and could be assisted by extension programs such as those conducted by Milwaukee Area Technical College. One of the major reasons for the college's relative success in delivering basic skills education has been its willingness to collaborate with so many different local community agencies. Other factors important in conducting a successful adult basic education program are the following: (1) establishing the program in the local community; (2) using existing local government bodies as sponsors--such an approach is exemplified by the Milwaukee Public Schools; (3) scheduling programs to meet the time constraints of disadvantaged persons, essentially adopting a flexible approach with multiple entries and exits; (4) creating a curriculum based on the survival skills needed by disadvantaged urban residents; (5) selecting empathetic, preferably local, neighborhood personnel for conducting the classes; (6) implementing successful recruitment efforts, such as using influential people in the neighborhoods; (7) organizing the learning environment in ways that do not intimidate or raise hostility in the clients; (8) being cognizant of the characteristics of the adult disadvantaged student; (9) recognizing the differences between adults' and children's learning styles and needs; (10) gearing instruction to individual differences; (11) recognizing and working with cultural differences; and (12) developing a sense of community among students and teachers. Although incorporating these factors into adult literacy programs should contribute to their success, such programs are having to compete increasingly for their share of limited budgets with high technology education and programs for more able students. (KC)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Milwaukee Area Technical College WI; Wisconsin (Milwaukee)
Note: Presented at the National Adult Education Conference (Philadelphia, PA, December 1, 1983).