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ERIC Number: ED237396
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Nov
Pages: 26
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Cultural Adjustment Difficulties of Japanese Adolescents Sojourning in the U.S.A. Occasional Papers in Intercultural Learning No. 5.
Hartung, Elizabeth Ann
The adjustment difficulties of Japanese high school students studying in the United States were examined in order to create a framework for the construction of orientation materials for exchange students. A total of 106 Japanese students enrolled in U.S. senior high schools as participants in the AFS Year Program to the United States completed a Japanese language questionnaire which asked them to rate and comment on 54 items describing potential adjustment problems. This report lists the questionnaire items and summarizes the student comments according to the U.S. culture in general, school life and peers, family life, and the use of English. Results indicate that for the students the most difficult aspects of living in America included knowing appropriate topics to talk about, understanding the way Americans showed emotions and American humor, making friends with other students, and getting used to the informal relationships between students and teachers. In general, there were few problems regarding the students' relationship with the host parents and children. However, when problems did arise, it was extremely difficult for the students to discuss them with the host family. Most students felt that they had not had adequate training in oral English. (RM)
Editor, Occasional Papers in Intercultural Learning, AFS International/Intercultural Programs, Inc., 313 East 43rd Street, New York, NY 10017.
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners; Community
Language: English
Sponsor: AFS International/Intercultural Programs, Inc., New York, NY.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Japanese People
Note: Article derived from the author's Master of Arts thesis, University of California-Los Angeles.