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ERIC Number: ED237241
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Apr
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Recognition, Development and Correlates of Self-Defined Physical Attractiveness among Young Children.
Downs, A. Chris; Reagan, Mary A.
A study was conducted to investigate issues related to the development of preschool children's self-definitions of attractiveness. Research questions were (1) At what ages can children state a self-definition of attractiveness? (2) Are self-definitions temporally stable? (3) To what degree are children's self-judgments similar to judgments made of them by socializers? and, (4) What is the relationship of children's self-judgments of their attractiveness to their behavior and to verbal reports of their behavior? A sample of 140 subjects included equal numbers of male and female white preschool children, 3 through 6 years of age, and their parents, teachers, and peers. Self-definitions of attractiveness were obtained by asking children to rate themselves on a three-point scale while looking in a mirror; self-definitions were obtained again 2 weeks later. Children were also asked to rate their own behaviors and were observed for positive and negative behaviors during free play. Additionally, parents and teachers rated each child's behaviors, and peers rated each child's attractiveness. Results indicated that children at all ages seem able to report self-judgments of attractiveness and that such reports exhibit short-term stability. Other findings indicated that self-judgments were more related to verbal reports of behavior than to observed playground behavior and that age and sex differences exist in the relationship of children's self-judgments to judgments made of them by socializers and other adult raters. (RH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Physical Attractiveness; Self Definition
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Western Psychological Association (San Francisco, CA, April 6-10, 1983).