NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED237012
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Jun-23
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
From School to College. Testimony to the National Commission on Excellence in Education. (Public Hearing, Chicago, Illinois, June 23, 1982).
Hargadon, Fred
Perspectives on secondary school preparation and college admissions, and specifically admissions to selective colleges, are provided. According to a 1977 Stanford University document (which is briefly summarized but not appended), there is considerable variation in the number of solid academic courses taken by high school students, and capable students appear to undertake relatively light academic programs. Admissions considerations for selective colleges are identified, and the following three criticisms of selective college admissions are discussed: (1) colleges place too much emphasis on grades and test scores and too little emphasis on personal qualities; (2) predicted success in college is not an adequate measure of predicted success in life; and (3) when colleges take "A" students and keep them "A" students, there is less value added than when colleges take "C" students and turn them into "B" students. Attention is directed to the notion that the key to improving the academic programs and performance of students is raising college admission standards. It is suggested that raising academic standards is linked to focusing resources and attention on academic programs, improving teaching conditions, attracting to schools high quality teachers, and promoting consultation between school teachers and college faculty. Concerns regarding minority students are also addressed. (SW)
Publication Type: Legal/Legislative/Regulatory Materials; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Excellence; National Commission on Excellence in Education
Note: For related documents, see ED 227 094, HE 016 788-808, HE 016 814, and HE 016 887.