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ERIC Number: ED236312
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982
Pages: 512
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Administrative Arrangements and a Curriculum for a University Training Programme for Adult Educators in Hong Kong.
Shak Wai Han, Therese
The feasibility of introducing a university training program for adult education in Hong Kong was investigated. A system approach to needs assessment was developed based on six steps: (1) identify problems based on needs, (2) determine a solution and identify alternatives, (3) select solution strategies from among alternatives, (4) develop the curriculum for the training program, (5) suggest administrative arrangements for implementation of the training program, and (6) recommend actions for program evaluation. The identification of problems was based on information from Hong Kong educational situations, British and Canadian universities, consultative groups, and related literature. Statistics showed a need for adult educators but not for regular and systematic training programs in Hong Kong. The university was indicated as the best place to train administrators and specialists who could, in turn, train volunteers and part-time teachers. Introduction of some basic courses in the existing Certificate in Education and Advanced Diploma in Education program appeared more favorable than introduction of a new program titled Certificate in Adult Education. Detailed curricula were developed for program electives; curriculum outlines were drawn for alternatives. Recommended administrative arrangements for program implementation were the hiring of two lecturers. Sample questionnaires for mid- and postprogram evaluations were suggested. The appendix constitutes one-third of the document and contains materials used in the study, including sample questionnaires. (YLB)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Masters Theses; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Administrators; Teachers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Hong Kong
Note: Master's thesis, University of Hong Kong.