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ERIC Number: ED234094
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Apr
Pages: 70
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Towards a Theoretical Conceptualization of Instructional Evaluation.
Perlberg, Arye
Instructional evaluation by students is viewed as one of the main vehicles to improve teaching-learning processes in higher education. There is also a growing trend to use this information for administrative purposes such as tenure, promotion and merit pay. On the other hand, reviews of research show almost consistently that written feedback from students, when given without any additional treatment, is not effective in achieving behavioral changes and improving teaching-learning processes. This paper provides explanations why there are slim chances that written or oral feedback alone will be effective in modifying behavior. In developing a theoretical conceptualization of instructional evaluation the author analyzes the role of teaching in higher education and the reward structure in the university organization; theories of feedback, motivation, behavioral and organization change, self-efficacy and attribution. Drawing on research in teacher education, training, coaching and faculty development, the paper points towards effective faculty development programs which entail multiple sources of feedback and confrontation techniques and which have better chances of improving teaching-learning processes in higher education in spite of a non-supportive organizational environment. (Author/PN)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Israel (Haifa)
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (67th, Montreal, Quebec, April 11-15, 1983).