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ERIC Number: ED233790
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Aug
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Role of Infant Cognitive Level in Mother-Infant Interaction.
Francis, Patricia L.; Jones, Freda A.
Videotapes of mother/infant pairs were made to assess the influence of selected infant and maternal characteristics on parent/child interaction. Characteristics of interest were infant mental age, infant chronological age, infant gender, and parity. Subjects were 37 mothers (20 primiparous, 17 multiparous) and their infants (19 males, 18 females) who had been referred to an infant evaluation clinic due to suspected developmental delay; 14 had experienced premature delivery. Videotapes were approximately 5 minutes in duration and were usually of mothers seated in a rocking chair with infant in arms. Two independent observers using a 5-second time-sampling technique coded the tapes, noting the frequency with which mothers and infants engaged in tactile, vocal, and visual interactions. Subsequently, three dyadic measures were derived from the coded behaviors; each measure was determined within specific modalities. In particular, instances were identified in which (1) either or both partners were engaged in interaction during the same 5-second period, (2) mother and infant took turns within the same period, and (3) both partners were engaged in the same activity during a time frame. Among the results was the finding that infant mental age and chronological age exerted differential impact on interactions. Higher amounts of tactile and visual interaction were found in primiparous dyads than in multiparous dyads. In contrast to findings with normal infant samples, no gender effects were found. (RH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Parity; Social Interaction
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association (90th, Washington, DC, August 23-27, 1982).