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ERIC Number: ED233470
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Feb
Pages: 30
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Model for Student Activity Programs. A Survey of Student Activity Programs in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, & Texas.
Vornberg, James A.; And Others
Using a sample of responses to questionnaires mailed to schools in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas, a study was made of student activity programs to locate the available and most effective programs, and to develop appropriate criteria for evaluating programs. It was found that the most available activities were student council (100 percent of the 102 responding schools), music organizations (99 percent), and interscholastic athletics (98 percent); intramural athletics were least available (48.5 percent). Participation by students, however, varied widely, from 10 percent to 75 percent of students in a school. The primary administration of programs varied among school administrators, student leaders, and faculty sponsors, but student interest was the major factor in creating new programs. Financial support was found to come mostly from money-raising projects, though athletics were funded mostly from appropriated monies. Only 28.7 percent of reporting schools had any type of formal evaluation of activity programs, raising the question of relative weight of such evaluative criteria as student opinions (ranked first by responding schools), educational goals, or cost. Respondents identified getting students involved, recruiting sponsors, scheduling activities, and budgeting as the four biggest problems in activity programs. The findings are incorporated into a seven-point model for organizing activity programs. (JW)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Phi Delta Kappa, Commerce, TX. East Texas State Chapter.
Identifiers: Arkansas; Kansas; Missouri; Oklahoma; Texas
Note: This research was partially funded by a District III Research Grant of Phi Delta Kappa.