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ERIC Number: ED233454
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Jun
Pages: 35
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Studying Enrollment Decline (and Other Timely Issues) via the Case Survey.
Berger, Michael A.
Using enrollment decline cases for data, the case survey method analyzes the content of case studies, thus allowing data from various cases to be aggregated and researchers to overcome constraints on data collection. The analyst uses six steps in this method in reviewing the case literature: (1) definition of the unit of analysis, (2) identification of case search strategy and case sources, (3) actual case search and selection, (4) checklist development, (5) checklist application to the cases, and (6) data analysis and interpretation. For enrollment decline, the unit of analysis chosen was that of case literature written between 1971 and 1980; the identification of case studies involved 10 sources, including journals, dissertations, and research suggested by scholarly organizations. Seventy representative cases were chosen and a checklist of 227 variables was prepared for application to the cases. Conventional statistical techniques were then used to determine the relationships between variables of interest to the researchers, including questions about the relationship of enrollment decline and school closings and the impact of declines on per-pupil costs. Although refinement is needed to ensure validity, adequate data, representative samples, and consistent application of checklists, the case survey method can successfully integrate fragmentary case studies and combine qualitative and quantitative methods of research. (JW)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Case Survey Method
Note: An earlier version of this paper was presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New York, NY, March 19-23, 1982). For related documents, see EA 015 726 and EA 015 871-877.