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ERIC Number: ED232947
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Apr
Pages: 20
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Effects of Gender-Fair Instructional Materials on Fourth, Seventh, and Eleventh Graders' Attitudes and Understanding.
Scott, Kathryn P.
A total of 172 students in 4th, 7th, and 11th grades read 4 stories excerpted from reading and social studies materials featuring main characters as either traditional or nontraditional females, or traditional or nontraditional males. The study sought to determine (1) the impact of male main characters in nontraditional roles on student's sex-role attitudes and story interest; (2) the impact of traditional and nontraditional stories on reading comprehension; and (3) the effect of age on sex-role attitudes, story interest, and reading comprehension. After reading the stories, participants were asked who they thought could do what the main character did and who they thought should do what the main character did. Five possible responses ranged from "only girls" to "only boys." Next, they completed a sex-role attitude inventory, a question indicating level of interest in each story, and four comprehension questions. After reading traditional stories, students tended to stereotype the activity of the main character. However, after reading nontraditional stories, students tended to believe that both males and females could do what the main character did. The higher the grade level, the higher the degree of stereotyping. Females preferred stories with traditional female and nontraditional male characters, but there were no significant preferences among boys. Few differences in comprehension were found for role condition or grade level. (KC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Florida State Univ., Tallahassee.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Montreal, Canada, April 11-15, 1983).