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ERIC Number: ED232866
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Jun
Pages: 235
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Report on National Engineering Career Development Study. Engineers' Profiles of the Eighties.
LeBold, William K.; Linden, Kathryn W.
This study was designed to provide information about factors that influenced career decisions and career development patterns of contemporary engineers. Graduate engineers (N=2835) and beginning student engineers (N=980) completed survey instruments designed to measure demographic, cognitive, affective, and behavioral factors. Subjects also completed Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory (SCII) and/or Purdue Interest Questionnaire. Included in this report are major research issues/questions, methodology, results, and conclusions. Two of the findings reported indicate that the subjects' career decisions and job values were strongly influenced by intrinsic and extrinsic work-related factors and that behavioral descriptions of typical engineers and student engineers (based on the SCII) are similar. Supporting documentation and statistics are provided in six appendices. This information includes marginal percentages for total engineering graduate group and for total student group on, item-response percentages by sex, ethnic group, employment field (for graduate survey), and major field (for student survey), and survey highlights sent to participants. The last appendix is a collection of eight complete research papers presented to professional organizations and articles submitted for publication. Each paper/article includes study rationale, methodology, results, conclusions, and implications. (JN)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN. Dept. of Freshman Engineering.
Identifiers: Engineering Education Research; National Science Foundation
Note: Some tables are marginally legible.