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ERIC Number: ED232433
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Oct
Pages: 289
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-0-904510-10-7
Bread and Dreams: A Case Study of Bilingual Schooling in the U.S.A. CARE Occasional Publications No. 12.
MacDonald, Barry; And Others
The background, design, results, and implications of an investigation of bilingual education, based on programs in Boston, are examined. The goals of the investigation were to: (1) portray bilingual schooling in practice; (2) provide an educational critique of bilingual schooling; (3) analyze the issues; and (4) review bilingual research, evaluation, and recommendations. An in-depth study was conducted at Boston's Rafael Hernandez Elementary School, which was observed for 3 weeks. Minor studies of three other Boston bilingual programs at the elementary, middle school, and high school levels were also conducted. The analysis involved a study of bilingual policy and politics in Boston, based on interviews and documents, supplemented by secondary bilingual data from the existing literature. Rafael Hernandez Elementary School is described through a visiting observer's reconstruction of events and experiences, followed by detailed information about the Hernandez school in action. A more structured and less detailed account of the three supplementary schools, which offer bilingual programs as an adjunct to a mainstream curriculum, is provided. The concluding section considers: language, teaching, and bilingual schooling; curriculum development and reunification; an overview of politics and bilingual education; and linguistic minorities in Britain. An appendix discusses the research design and methods. (SW)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: University of East Anglia, Norwich (England). Centre for Applied Research in Education.
Identifiers: Massachusetts (Boston); Rafael Hernandez Elementary School MA
Note: Not available in paper copy due to small type.