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ERIC Number: ED231698
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Jan
Pages: 32
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Multicultural Education: Emancipation or Containment?
Troyna, Barry
A review of research in the United Kingdom reveals that multicultural education does little to remove the employment obstacles which confront black youth; instead, racist practices operating in the recruitment and selection of labor play a significant part in determining the life changes of ethnic minorities. Multicultural education in the United Kingdom is based on the premise that if the academic performances of black youth are enhanced, then employment opportunities will increase. However, research indicates that of 300 employing establishments in England and Wales, over half did not specify formal qualifications. Those that responded indicated that they would consider applicants without the specified qualifications. Further, black unemployed tend to be better qualified than their white counterparts, a pattern which holds true for young black school leavers. Yet, a South London study reveals that unemployment among black school leavers is three times higher than among white school leavers. Clearly, employment institutions rather than the educational system perpetuate inequality. Informal (word-of-mouth) recruitment strategies exclude black youth from the opportunities available to white youth by maintaining the status quo in the ethnic composition of organizations. Thus, the emphasis on the promotion of minority life styles in the classroom, a key feature of multicultural education, will do little to remove the barriers which block black youths' chances at upward social mobility. (KC)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: United Kingdom
Note: Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference: 'Social Crisis, Educational Research and Social Policy' (Birmingham, England, January 3-5, 1983). The document is marginally legible.