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ERIC Number: ED231689
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Mar
Pages: 70
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Cognitive and Conversational Strategies in the Expression of Ethnic Prejudice. Prepublication/Working Paper No. 2.
van Dijk, Teun A.
In order to design a cognitive model of ethnic attitudes, an interdisciplinary project has analyzed strategies used in everyday conversation among majority members about minority groups, e.g., immigrant workers from Turkey and Morocco and people from Surinam. Data were collected through undirected interviews among people in an Amsterdam neighborhood where a relatively high percentage of ethnic minorities live. Following background information and a discussion of the general notion of strategy, a detailed discussion points out the complex sequences of social interaction, which involve pragmatic, semantic, stylistic, and rhetorical discourse strategies. Subtle discourse analysis of the transcribed interviews suggests hypotheses about the contents, representation, and strategic uses of ethnic attitudes (and prejudice, in particular). Strategic moves may be defined at several layers of analysis and along several dimensions. Also, it appears that quite a number of moves and move sequences appear to be typical for talk about ethnic minorities. These moves are categorized as dissimulation (e.g., vagueness, presupposition), defense (justification, explanation of attitudes), accusation (blaming, negative experiences with ethnic groups), and positive self-presentation. Future research will involve an analysis between specific kinds of prejudiced beliefs and specific moves and strategies. Transcripts of some interviews are presented in English and Dutch. (KC)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands).
Identifiers: Netherlands (Amsterdam)
Note: For a related document, see ED 229 296. First version of a paper for the International Conference on Social Psychology and Language (2nd, Bristol, England, July 18-22, 1983). This series of working papers was sponsored by the Netherlands Organization for the Advancement of Pure Research (ZWO).