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ERIC Number: ED230645
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Apr
Pages: 42
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Effects of Instructional Setting and Approach in Compensatory Education: A Statewide Analysis.
Yap, Kim Onn
Evaluation data from Title I compensatory education projects under the Hawaii State Department of Education were collected to examine the effects of different instructional settings and approaches on the achievement of Title I students who received remedial reading and mathematics instruction from 1978 to 1981. Based on the descriptive statistics, project profiles were developed, indicating enrollments, hours of instruction, costs, student achievement gains, and other characteristics of the different Title I projects within the State. It was found that in general, for the three school years considered: (1) students in lower grades made greater Normal Curve Equivalent (NCE) score gains than those in higher grades; (2) smaller school and project sizes were associated with greater NCE gains; (3) students with lower pretest scores made greater gains than those with higher pretest scores; (4) higher per pupil costs were associated with greater NCE gains; (5) absenteeism was inversely related to achievement gains; (6) the pull-out setting had a more favorable impact on achievement than other instructional settings; and (7) combined instructional approaches (e.g., a prescribed system supplemented by teacher-made materials) produced greater gains than an approach that used commercially packaged materials with a prescribed instructional system, or one that used both commercially-packaged and teacher-made materials without a prescribed instructional system. (MJL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Elementary Secondary Education Act Title I; Hawaii State Department of Education; Normal Curve Equivalent Scores
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Montreal, Quebec, Canada, April 11-15, 1983).