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ERIC Number: ED230644
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983
Pages: 25
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Effects of Student Teams and Individualized Instruction on Cross-Race and Cross-Sex Friendships.
Oishi, Sabine; And Others
A sample of 160 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students in a Baltimore City (Maryland) magnet school participated in an experimental study on the effects within cross-race and cross-sex friendships on a mathematics program that used Team Assisted Individualization (TAI). TAI is an instructional method that combines individualized instruction with cooperative learning. Children of different race, sex, and achievement levels worked in small teams on individualized materials. Team members depended on one another for skill checks and were encouraged to assist their teammates with problems. Members' performances counted toward a team score, and teams that met certain preset standards were rewarded. Pretest and posttest scores on two sociometric instruments and two peer rating scales were compared with measures for a control group. Results indicated that: (1) compared to students in the control group, those in the experimental group demonstrated greater increases in cross-race friendships, and fewer rejections of peers from other races; (2) experimental group students less frequently rated students of other races or of the opposite sex as "not nice"; and (3) positive effects of TAI on cross-race friendships appeared to be due primarily to reductions in negative attitudes of white students toward black students. (MJL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD. Center for Social Organization of Schools.
Identifiers: Baltimore City Public Schools MD; Cross Race Interaction; Cross Sex Friendship; Team Assisted Individualization
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Educational Research Association (Montreal, Quebec, Canada, April 11-14, 1983).