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ERIC Number: ED230094
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982
Pages: 51
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Increasing Student Competence & Persistence: The Best Case for General Education. A Report of the College Outcome Measures Project (COMP).
Forrest, Aubrey
The relationships between features of general education programs/services and student persistence rates and test score gains are examined, based on a study conducted during 1976-1982 by the College Outcome Measures Project. In addition, the costs of general education and measurement of its effectiveness are briefly addressed. The study of 44 colleges focused on outcome measures and the following five broad program features: (1) orientation and advising new students; (2) general education curricular objectives and requirements, (3) instructional dimensions, (4) extracurricular activities, and (5) general institutional characteristics. The outcomes measures were as follows: student scores on the College Outcome Measures Project, scores on the American College Testing program or the Scholastic Aptitude Test, estimated score gains from entering freshman status to graduation, percentage of entering full-time freshmen who return for sophomore year, and percentage of entering full-time freshmen who graduate in 5 years (at senior institutions) or in 3 years (at community colleges). It is proposed that general education programs should help increase student abilities and motivation to graduate and their competence in adult roles after graduation. Specific recommendations for improving general education are proposed. (SW)
The American College Testing Program, P.O. Box 168, 2201 North Dodge, Iowa City, IA 52243 ($4.00; 6 copies or more, $3.00 each).
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: American Coll. Testing Program, Iowa City, IA. National Center for the Advancement of Educational Practices.
Identifiers: College Outcome Measures Project