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ERIC Number: ED229680
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Aug
Pages: 37
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Women's Intuition: The Effect of Subordinate Role upon Interpersonal Sensitivity.
Snodgrass, Sara E.
Interpersonal sensitivity refers to the perception of the thoughts, feelings and reactions of another person with whom one is interacting. To examine the effects of sex and leader/subordinate role upon interpersonal sensitivity, female, male and mixed-sex dyads (N=72) were first observed in interaction and then asked to complete questionnaires. Data analyses showed that those in subordinate roles were more sensitive to the feelings of the other dyad member than those in leader roles. Subordinates were more sensitive to how the leader felt about them than to how the leaders felt about themselves and leaders were primarily sensitive to how the subordinates felt about themselves. While there was no main effect for sex, mixed-sex dyads were more sensitive than same-sex dyads, and females were more sensitive to males than to other females. The results suggest these interaction effects provide evidence that sensitivity is an interactive process, affected by the respective roles of the interactants. (WAS)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Intuition
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (90th, Washington, DC, August 23-27, 1982).