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ERIC Number: ED228912
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Jan
Pages: 23
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Review of the Literature: Black Student Retention in Higher Education Institutions.
Dunston, F. Myron; And Others
Issues pertaining to the retention of black students, particularly those attending predominantly white colleges and universities, are reviewed, based on a survey of the literature. Three categories of concerns were found in the literature: ways of conceiving black student retention; factors affecting retention; and strategies and remedies to increase retention. During the early to mid-1960s, there was an emphasis on integrating black students into white university systems, while after the civil rights movement, many called for an educational process that addressed the intellectual and cultural needs of black students. Level of academic preparation has been found to be a central determinant of student persistence, and alienation and group identification have also been identified as key influences on attrition. Remedial strategies identified by the literature include: expanded efforts in outreach, recruitment, and admissions; more responsive counseling, student affairs, basic skills, and tutorial services; the continued development of special programs and services; and improved faculty, staff, and student awareness of underprepared students and their preferred modes of learning. A bibliography of approximately 85 publications is appended. (SW)
Publication Type: Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Research and Evaluation Associates, Inc., Chapel Hill, NC.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: This paper was identified by a joint project of the Institute on Desegregation at North Carolina Central University and the ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education at The George Washington University.