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ERIC Number: ED228571
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Aug
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Arguments with Parents and Parent-Peer Involvement during Adolescence.
Montemayor, Raymond
The validity of adolescents' responses to questions about the quality of their relationships with parents and peers is often limited by memory distortions, stereotypic response tendencies, and social desirability. In order to obtain more detailed reports about their behavior than is possible using questionnaires, and to investigate the relationship between parent and peer involvement and the association between conflict with parents and peer orientation, a time use methodology was developed. Reports on time use and parent conflict over a 3-day period were obtained from 64 adolescents through telephone interviews. Free time, task time, and measures of conflict were assessed. Data analyses showed that adolescents spent equal amounts of time with parents and peers, but engaged in different types of activities with these two groups, i.e., work and task activities with parents and play and recreation with peers. Time spent with parents was negatively correlated with peer time for females and with time spent alone for males. Adolescents who had disagreeable relations with their mothers spent much of their time with their fathers, not with peers. The sex differences revealed support the idea that males and females follow very different developmental pathways in separating from their parents. (Author/JAC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Time Studies
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (90th, Washington, DC, August 23-27, 1982).