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ERIC Number: ED228353
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Feb
Pages: 96
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Study of Discrepant Reading Achievement of Minority and White Students in a Desegregating School District. Additional Findings: Phase Two, Phase Three and Phase Five: Longitudinal Analysis of High and Low Achieving Students.
Zafirau, James; Fleming, Margaret
This report presents data on elementary students' reading achievement collected in phase five of a study carried out in Cleveland, Ohio, public schools and also includes supplementary findings from phases two and three. The study compared reading achievement of minority and white students; identified different characteristics of schools with high versus those with low minority to white achievement discrepancies; and examined differential characteristics of high versus low achieving students. Phase two findings compare white and minority reading scores, suspension rates, and promotion ratios in schools with the smallest versus schools with the largest white to minority discrepancies. Phase three findings identify predictors of reading achievement, and suggest that a school's social process factors are more consequentially related to the academic growth of minorities than of whites. Phase five findings, which are based on 1974-1981 data on background factors associated with academic success, indicate: (1) higher reading achievement scores; (2) a significant influence of poverty on achievement; and (3) higher average background academic indicator scores among students who scored higher on 1981 reading achievement tests. Statistical tables are appended to the report. (Author/MJL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Numerical/Quantitative Data
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Cleveland Public Schools, OH.
Identifiers: Cleveland Public Schools OH
Note: For related documents, see ED 218 390, ED 219 469, and UD 022 704. Appendices are marginally legible.