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ERIC Number: ED227520
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Feb
Pages: 33
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Interpersonal Persuasion I: Formulation and First Test of a Rules-Based Theory.
Lulofs, Roxane Salyer
A great deal of research has been done in the area of "compliance-message" tactics and strategies, but this research has not produced a coherent framework for studying this interpersonal communication process. Based on six axioms concerning the nature of communication behavior in general and on one postulate and five theorems defining the interpersonal persuasion process, such a framework was created and partially tested in a study involving 104 college students. The study investigated whether (1) clusters of tactics constituting strategies could be identified on the basis of the content of the tactics, (2) tactics to resist persuasion could be differentiated from those to persuade on the basis of content, (3) messages identified theoretically as nontactical could be distinguished from tactical statements on the basis of content, and (4) general rules concerning interpersonal persuasion could be discerned from the judgments respondents made concerning tactics. The subjects sorted slips of paper containing statements corresponding to interpersonal persuasion tactics into at least 3 and not more than 11 piles based on the similarity of the content of the statements. Cluster analysis produced nine clusters and three centroids from the responses, all significant. Results indicated that there is a logic underlying the content of interpersonal persuasion tactics that is recognizable by those who use them and that tactics to resist persuasion and those to persuade can be differentiated, as can tactical and nontactical messages. (FL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Rules Based Theory; Theory Development
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Western Speech Communication Association (Albuquerque, NM, February 19-22, 1983).