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ERIC Number: ED227389
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Aug
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Managerial Decision Making: The Effects of Structuring Controversy and Consensus.
Tjosvold, Dean; Field, Richard H. G.
By structuring the manner group members use to reach a decision, managers can affect the processes and outcomes of decision making. Business administration undergraduates (N=78) were randomly assigned to three groups and told to make group decisions based on the process their manager selected, i.e., they were either to seek concurrence, debate opposing views, or express their own views as they made their decisions. During discussion, managers acted as observers rating quality of the decision, acceptance of it, and interpersonal attitudes. Participants also rated the decisions and the group interrelationships. Analyses of results indicated that participants in the controversy condition were uncertain about both their knowledge and the decision, but explored the problem in depth. Participants in the concurrence seeking condition felt confident about their understanding and the decision, though they did not explore the problem fully. They indicated they liked each other and felt their relationship was cooperative. Participants in the consensus condition were more confident about their understanding and decision but did not actually explore the problem as thoroughly as participants in the controversy condition. The findings suggest that controversy generates the greatest problem exploration. (Author/JAC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Consensus; Controversy
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (90th, Washington, DC, August 23-27, 1982). Study supported by the National Sciences Engineering Council of Canada.