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ERIC Number: ED226288
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Aug
Pages: 25
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Work and Nonwork: An Analysis of Personal Meaning.
Anthony, Steven M.; Rice, Robert W.
Spillover and compensation are two recurrent hypotheses concerning the relationship between work and nonwork. Spillover proposes a basic similarity between an individual's activities and feelings in both the world of work, and nonwork; compensation proposes fundamental dissimilarity between the individual's world of work and nonwork. To focus on individual and situational characteristics predictive of spillover or compensation three hypotheses were examined for the relationships expected between spillover, compensation, and intrinsic work satisfaction: (1) satisfaction with work is positively related to the tendency to engage in nonwork activities that spill over from work activities; (2) satisfaction with work is negatively related to the tendency to engage in nonwork activities that compensate for work activities, and (3) both spillover and compensation with respect to a single job are possible. Employees (N=81) completed a questionnaire designed to elicit information about leisure and work activities. Analyses of results supported all three hypotheses and indicated that two-thirds of the sample experienced both spillover and compensation between their leisure and job activities. The findings suggest that the general tendencies for individuals to compensate or spillover is not as crucial as the specific activities and specific personal meanings associated with spillover and compensation. Further research is suggested to determine if these conclusions can be applied to a broad band of the labor force. (PAS)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Meaningfulness
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (90th, Washington, DC, August 23-27, 1982).