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ERIC Number: ED225871
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Sep
Pages: 120
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Engineering and Computer Science Education in California Public Higher Education. Commission Report 82-33.
California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.
A ten-part questionnaire was administered to deans and directors of all engineering programs of the University of California, California State University, University of the Pacific, and Loyola Marymount University. This seven-part report is based on responses obtained by the questionnaires. The first part describes differing opinions about shortages or surpluses of supply of engineers, computer scientists, and other technologically skilled workers. The second identifies engineering and computer science programs in California colleges/universities, reports their enrollments, and discusses major problems regarding enrollments. The third describes the shortage of engineering and computer science faculty nationally and in California, with particular emphasis on the California State University and the University of California. The fourth identifies pressing problems of equipment and facilities, including not merely deferred maintenance and replacements but also the lack of technologically-advanced equipment already used in industry. The fifth points to sources of inadequate preparation of students, both nationally and in California. The sixth notes incentives that industry are providing universities and that states are providing to their public universities to develop technological expertise. And the seventh summarizes the report by pointing to the educational and financial implications of issues discussed in previous sections for educational policy makers in California. (Author/JN)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.
Identifiers: California
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