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ERIC Number: ED225422
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981
Pages: 18
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Survey of Non-Returning Students, Spring, 1981.
Eagle, Norman
The reasons for withdrawal by students qualified to return to Bronx Community College (BCC) were studied. A short survey form consisting of three open-ended questions was sent to 153 of the dropouts, while a long form with about 30 objective questions was sent to 1,498 dropouts. Thirty-two responses to the short form and 250 responses to the long form revealed that financial pressures and personal, health, and family-related problems constituted a large majority of the reasons given by students for not returning to BCC. One-third of all responses related to the cost of college, the need for money, or a job; 26.9 percent of the students gave personal, family, health, marriage, and maternity reasons. About 17-20 percent of the remaining students cited academic difficulties, the need for tutoring and counseling, and unavailability of needed courses and schedules as reasons for withdrawing. About 22 percent of the dropouts intended to transfer to another school, and 15.3 percent actually enrolled in other schools (39 percent at private or public trade or career schools, 36 percent at four-year City University of New York colleges, and 23 percent at other community colleges). The 215 responses to a question about future plans indicated that almost 75 percent intended to re-enroll at BCC during the next 1 to 2 years. Students requested assistance with finances, financial aid counseling, fee payment flexibility, and more opportunities for employment. Course scheduling was a second major need area identified by students. (SW)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: City University of New York Bronx Community Coll
Note: This paper was identified by a joint project of the Institute on Desegregation at North Carolina Central University and the ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education at The George Washington University.