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ERIC Number: ED224383
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Barber-Scotia College: Needs Assessment of Education Program.
Olagunju, Amos O.
The need to continue or renew the Teacher Certificate Program at Barber-Scotia College was examined. Data are presented on student enrollments in the education programs during 1977-1980 by subject area and sophomore, junior, and senior classification. Although student enrollment declines were found in education programs at the college, an evaluation of 1977, 1979, and 1981 graduates appeared to indicate that the education program provided more career opportunities than other major courses at the college. According to the Education Division Head, the only major reason affecting student attrition was a requirement that a grade point average of 2.50 be maintained. Other possible reasons for poor performance of education majors may include undertaking too many credit hours in a semester and not enough flexibility in the required core courses. Based on the findings, it is recommended that education programs at the college be continued and a support program for education majors be established, including tutoring and remedial classes. It is noted that some southern colleges and universities are attempting to limit the enrollments in teacher education programs in response to a reported national surplus of teachers. It is proposed that such a limitation at a predominantly black college like Barber-Scotia may be unwise, and that the 1980 enrollment of 31 education students needs to be increased to the 1977 level of 74 students. In the attempt to increase student enrollments, the college's standards should be preserved. (SW)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Department of Education, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Barber-Scotia Coll., Concord, NC.
Identifiers: Barber Scotia College NC
Note: This paper was identified by a joint project of the Institute on Desegregation at North Carolina Central University and the ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education at The George Washington University.