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ERIC Number: ED224370
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Oct
Pages: 44
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Direct Assessment and Treatment of Attrition and Retention Problems.
Olagunju, Amos O.
A student attrition research methodology and results of attrition research at Barber-Scotia College are examined. Questionnaire responses from 137 students indicated the degree of student satisfaction with academic and social services provided by the college. Data are presented on student enrollments by class during 1970-1980, and on student attrition rates from freshmen to senior year. Questionnaire responses included the following: (1) library and work/study supervision--well-satisfying; (2) teaching methods, advising, and course scheduling--satisfying (good); (3) course materials, classroom environment, dormitory living conditions, and financial aid information--partially satisfying; and (4) recreational activities, college regulations, sports equipment, and food services--partially satisfying or dissatisfying. A condensed version of students' suggested changes, comments on services, and educational experiences is appended. Reasons for student attrition (fall 1979-1981) are indicated, along with data on student age groups and sources of student funds. Since about 18 percent of the recorded explanations on student attrition were attributable to poor performance and academic suspension, it is recommended that student educational support programs be provided. It is suggested that Barber-Scotia enrollments could be increased by: introducing additional occupational and technical programs; sending a college recruiter to the public schools to provide information on programs and job opportunities; and improving food, health, and recreational services. A questionnaire is appended. (SW)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Department of Education, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Barber-Scotia Coll., Concord, NC.
Identifiers: Barber Scotia College NC
Note: This paper was identified by a joint project of the Institute on Desegregation at North Carolina Central University and the ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education at The George Washington University.