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ERIC Number: ED224366
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1971-Apr
Pages: 40
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Save Black Schools. What Is the Future of Black Higher Education in North Carolina. A Report on the Crisis in Black Higher Education in North Carolina.
Student Organization for Black Unity, Greensboro, NC.
Problems faced by blacks in higher education in North Carolina are analyzed with focus on inadequate financial support for black colleges. It is suggested that factors affecting the status of black institutions are (1) the traditional state educational priorities, and (2) the history of political maneuvering that has resulted in a misguided placing of priorities, at the expense of education in general and black education in particular. The background on higher education in North Carolina is reviewed for the early, mid-, and late 1960's. As of 1971, the predominantly black institutions received about 12 percent of the total budget appropriations for state-supported schools. Inadequate financing of the black schools has resulted in inferior physical facilities, as well as lower faculty and staff pay scales. Five plans for reorganizing North Carolina higher education are briefly outlined, and it is claimed that none provides concretely for the preservation and rapid development of the five predominantly black institutions. Basically, the problems for the black colleges are: securing sufficient financial support to expand and develop; maintaining their racial characteristic; and defining a relevant educational philosophy and process. Appended materials include the following: data on state college enrollments and resource allocation, a statement of Governor Robert Scott, a memo concerning restructuring higher education, a joint resolution from the North Carolina General Assembly, and lists of members of the reorganization committee and members of the state board of higher education. (SW)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Student Organization for Black Unity, Greensboro, NC.
Identifiers: North Carolina
Note: This paper was identified by a joint project of the Institute on Desegregation at North Carolina Central University and the ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education at The George Washington University.