NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED224160
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Sep
Pages: 413
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
School Sorting and Disclosure: Disclosure to Parents as a School Reform Strategy.
Sugarman, Stephen D.; And Others
Investigated in this study are the school sorting process (how students are matched with schools, courses, and teachers) and the possible positive effects of mandating that schools disclose how this process occurs. After an introduction, chapters 2 and 3 present findings about the sorting practices in seven California school districts. It was found that most schools do not have mechanisms for informing people about school sorting. Examples of materials schools use to inform parents of other matters mandated by school law are contained in chapter 3. Chapter 4 provides a theoretical basis for school disclosure by investigating information disclosure in general. Chapter 5 lists possible virtues of disclosure, including increased parent "take-up" of the choices open to them, prevention of unfair practices, and greater public satisfaction with education. Chapter 6 investigates possible negative effects of school disclosure, including increased costs, increased work for personnel, professional demoralization, and parent confusion from information overload. Chapter 7 presents a policy analysis of school sorting disclosure. Chapter 8 examines the possibility of a due process right to school sorting disclosure. In chapter 9, a statutory analysis of school sorting and disclosure is undertaken. Conclusions and recommendations presented in chapter 10 include the recommendation that social experiments in school sorting disclosure be undertaken on the state level. (Author/JM)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: California; School Sorting
Note: Portions of chapter 3 will not reproduce due to illegibility of original document.