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ERIC Number: ED223643
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Jul
Pages: 31
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-0-7240-417-5
ISSN: N/A
Vocational Interest Survey--Six Scales for the Measurement of Holland's Vocational Typology. Research Report.
Athanasou, James A.
This report describes the initial development of the Vocational Interest Survey (VIS), which is comprised of six experimental scales for the measurement of Holland's vocational typology. The initial item pool was generated by the free-association written responses of high school students. Occupational titles were selected for inclusion in a pilot questionnaire if the students mentioned them more than twice. The scale was administered to vocationaal guidance clients. Items for the six Vocational Interest Survey scales were selected on the basis of cluster analysis of the 138-item pilot questionnaire, along with repeated item-total correlation analyses. The resulting six scales contained 105 items and provided internal consistency reliability ranging from 0.72 to 0.93. Principal components analysis of the scales produced a two-dimensional structure of interests. Scores on the VIS were related to existing interest measures. The results confirmed "positively" each of the six scales' construct validity. When VIS scores were compared with those for personality and ability measures, the results confirmed "negatively" the construct validity of each of the VIS scales. The VIS will provide counselors with information at low cost and with a brief investment of time. These experimental scales are intended for use in guidance and research. (Author/DWH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: New South Wales Dept. of Industrial Relations and Technology, Darlinghurst (Australia). Div. of Vocational Guidance Services.
Identifiers: Australia; Hollands Hexagonal Model; Hollands Theory of Occupational Choice
Note: Appendices are marginally legible because of small print.