NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED223589
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982
Pages: 70
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Advocates of Change: An Analysis of Deans' Roles as Directors of Dean's Grant Projects.
Sivage, Carole R.
Results and analysis of interviews, with deans and faculty members at ten schools of education are reported in this study, focusing on deans' roles and behaviors as administrators of Dean's Grant Projects. Large research institutions and smaller, primarily teacher training, institutions participated in the study. The purpose of the Dean's Grants Program, to incorporate special education awareness in teacher preparation programs, is summarized. Seven case studies are presented, providing highlights of essential features of Dean's Grant Projects and personnel adaptation. A review of literature on administrative advocacy and change agents in education is integrated with a three-part discussion of the study results. In the first section, advocacy and administrative support techniques are defined. Three advocative roles assumed by deans are illustrated through quotations and situations: persuader, negotiator, and choreographer. The second section presents an analysis of the perceived intensity of deans' involvement, ranging from symbolic support to active involvement. Nonsupportive behaviors such as inconsistency, carelessness, and thoughtlessness are noted in the third section. Eight conclusions are reached, and benefits accruing to deans from their participation in the program are listed. Appended are questions used in the interviews with the deans. (FG)
Not available separately; see SP 021 364.
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Deans Grant Project
Note: In: Sivage, Carole R., And Others. Politics, Power, and Personality: The Roles of Deans in Dean's Grant Projects. Minnesota, National Support Systems Project, 1982. p1-70. ; Also funded through the University of Maryland National Professional Leadership Development Program.