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ERIC Number: ED223210
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-May
Pages: 10
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Development of Aural Perception of Selected Percepts of Musical Form Utilizing Programed Instruction.
Bridges, Nicholas
The relative effectiveness of teaching methods using programmed instructional materials to teach musical percepts--phrase, theme, introduction, interlude, coda, binary form, ternary form, and rondo form--was studied. The 124 undergraduate elementary education majors used as subjects were found to be similar in aural perception, length of musical training, and attitudes toward listening. Subjects were assigned to either the control group or one of the two experimental groups. A 13-lesson unit of self-paced, programmed, audiotaped materials was used. One experimental group used the materials independently, while another used the same programmed materials in a whole-class setting with a music teacher using the same script and programmed examples. Both groups used workbooks containing objectives, reinforcement of visual information, and space for student responses. On both immediate and delayed posttests, teacher-presented, whole-class programmed lessons in audiotape format were significantly more effective in developing discrimination of musical form than the same lessons used in an individualized setting. The variable length of prior musical experience considered alone and in combination had no significant effect, and no attitude shift was observed. Both experimental groups scored significantly higher on posttest and retention tests. Further research in musical percepts and methods is necessary. (LMM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: AECT Research and Theory Division Meeting; Musical Analysis
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, Research and Theory Division (Dallas, TX, May 1982). For other papers, see IR 010 442-487.