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ERIC Number: ED222896
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Jul
Pages: 31
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Rival Theories of Newsreading in the Electronic Newspaper Arena.
Dozier, David M.
Emerging videotex news services--systems for distributing textual information on television screens that permit direct competition with pulp newspapers--are presently rooted in a limited theory of newsreading. The first of two rival theories of newsreading applicable to electronic newspapers is "uses and gratifications" research--the belief that the audience is active and that an important part of mass media use is goal directed. Such research, however, ignores the possibility that newspapers are read for pleasure and for no ulterior purpose and suggests that the adaption of work-related, task-oriented storage and retrieval systems to videotex newspapers is theoretically appropriate. A second newsreading theory, the ludenic theory, asserts that the process of newsreading is intrinsically pleasurable, and that pleasure is at the root of both mature, highly ritualized newsreading as well as more casual, unstructured newsreading. On the surface, an electronic newspaper with countless information retrieval options would seem to embrace the concepts of selectivity and apperception inherent to pleasure reading, but the "true" ludenic electronic newspaper would consist of a number of information items strung together electronically in a manner that enhances the newsreading of an audience segment. The key to successful development of electronic newspapers is development of forms consistent with the type of play that characterizes such newsreading. True ludenic newsreading cannot be transformed into a task-oriented drudgery of data base manipulation and intricate information-recovery protocols. (HTH)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers; Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Media Use
Note: Figure 2 and Table 1 will not reproduce because of small print. Paper given at Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism (65th, Athens, OH, July 25-28, 1982).