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ERIC Number: ED221845
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Sep-25
Pages: 21
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Administrative Leadership in Reading: A Professional Quagmire.
Lilly, Edward R.
Although some consider the administrator as primarily a manager of a school's reading program, the dominant view sees him or her as an instructional leader, setting the tone, providing the impetus, and defining the school's philosophy for reading. In this role, the administrator must work cooperatively with teachers. Inadequate background and clerical pressures, however, may prevent the administrator from fulfilling such a role. The reading consultant's role is also often inadequately defined and executed, resulting in understaffing or the assignment of duties for which the reading specialist is untrained. Given these circumstances, the following six suggestions should be followed: (1) administrators need knowledge of administrative and leadership theories, group phenomena, and social system theory; (2) they have the responsibility to provide effective learning environments; (3) school administrators and reading personnel should establish closer lines of communication with reading staffs; (4) administrators should consult with colleges and universities to strengthen their administrative and supervisory reading skills; (5) research should be undertaken to investigate the roles of specialized reading personnel; and (6) studies of schools should be undertaken to investigate factors that promote successful reading programs. (JL)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Guides - Non-Classroom; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Theory Practice Relationship
Note: Paper presented at the Meeting of the District of Columbia Reading Council of the International Reading Association (Washington, DC, September 1982).