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ERIC Number: ED221644
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982
Pages: 18
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Desegregation of Black and Hispanic Students from 1968 to 1980. A Report to the Subcommittee on Civil and Constitutional Rights of the Committee on the Judiciary of the United States House of Representatives. Working Paper.
Orfield, Gary
Between 1968 and 1980, segregation of black students in the United States declined significantly, especially in the South. During the seventies, black segregation was reduced in all regions of the country, except in the Northeast which became more segregated. Increasing segregation was found in large, older industrial states and cities with extremely large minority populations and no major desegregation plans. The greater progress in student segregation in the South and other states was related to thorough enforcement of Federal legislation and court orders on civil rights and desegregation. However, evidence of a small increase in segregation from 1978 to 1980, even in the South, suggested the need for government initiatives to sustain the momentum of increasing integration. The data showed no decline in Hispanic student segregation in the seventies, and suggested even greater segregation in the future. Hispanic segregation was found to be concentrated in areas, particulary in the West, with large and growing proportions of Hispanics. The analysis suggested that if the progress in racial integration that the South experienced is to be achieved in the North and West, clear policies must be formulated for large metropolitan areas where the entire city school district and some older suburbs have become predominantly minority areas. (Author/MJL)
Joint Center for Political Studies, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004 (no charge).
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Joint Center for Political Studies, Washington, DC.
Identifiers: United States