NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED221600
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Mar
Pages: 25
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
An Instrument for Measuring Concerns Change Facilitators Have about Their Role in Facilitating Change.
Rutherford, William L.; And Others
The Change Facilitator Stages of Concern Questionnaire (CFSoCQ) as a procedure for studying the concerns of change facilitators is presented. It is based on the work of Francis Fuller, the concept of Stages of Concern, and the Concerns Based Adoption Model which deal with change facilitators' concerns regarding implementation of an innovative program. Defining the CFSoCQ required a combination of innovation-related items and change facilitator role-related items. Analyses of descriptive concerns data identified a set of seven Change Facilitator Stages of Concern. In 1979, a questionnaire was developed to measure these concerns. Pilot studies were conducted with factor analyses and item analyses selecting five items for each stage resulting in a measure that has independent scales and high internal reliability. The CFSoCQ provides a means for measuring the concerns of leaders which have a significant influence on their leadership behavior and in turn makes it possible to study the influence of those concerns on facilitator behavior. Briefly, a relatively high score indicates intense concerns on that stage; low scores indicate low intensity or absence of concern. An interpretation procedures manual is under development. (PN)
The University of Texas at Austin, Research and Development Center for Teacher Education, Education Annex 3.203, Austin, TX 78712 ($2.25).
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Texas Univ., Austin. Research and Development Center for Teacher Education.
Identifiers: Concerns Based Adoption Model; Stages of Concern Questionnaire
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (66th, New York, NY, March 19-23, 1982).