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ERIC Number: ED220901
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Aug
Pages: 31
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Coordination of Verbal and Nonverbal Interaction towards Three Parties: The Analysis of a Talk Show.
von Raffler-Engel, Walburga
A study of randomly selected "Donahue" shows revealed how host Phil Donahue interacts with several parties at one time and how he subordinates various interactions to suit the hierarchy of importance he attributes to each party, with the television viewer being the most important. Donahue organizes his body movement mainly for television viewers. Even when talking with his visitors, the studio audience, and the telephone callers, he faces and leans toward the viewers and uses compensating head and trunk twisting movements to maintain contact with them. Donahue's face is quite expressive, and he is particularly adept at raising his eyebrows and maintaining eye contact. He gesticulates with an almost Latin frequency, but the range and direction of his movements are within the Anglo tradition. He is also an expert at shrugging his shoulders, pointing, and waving. He uses the way he holds the microphone as a turn taking signal for his audience, and he is quite skillful in his use of proxemics to increase intimacy with one party while maintaining contact with another. He runs to his visitors and guests, comes close but does not invade their private space, rarely touches women (a slight tap on the shoulder), and never touches men. He generally dresses in a light blue suit, but does not make any use of clothing or ornaments. (Actual photos of Donahue in action accompany the paper.) (JL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Donahue (Phil); Talk Shows
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the World Congress of Sociology (10th, Mexico City, Mexico, August 16-21, 1982). Contains photographs that may not reproduce clearly.