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ERIC Number: ED220486
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Mar
Pages: 43
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Children's Cognitions and Feelings about Classroom Moral, Conventional and Achievement Norms.
Blumenfeld, Phyllis C.; And Others
The development of social cognitions about classroom life and their potential influence on children's classroom behavior were studied. Each of 360 first and fifth grade children from schools in middle class and working class neighborhoods were interviewed using booklets illustrating classroom behavior. The results indicated that children do differentiate among domains of classroom life; their cognitions of importance and emotional responses concerning behaviors are shaped as much by consideration of consequences and external realities as they are by developmentally based changes in comprehension of reasons for these norms. Age differences in perceptions reflect less extreme judgements of goodness and badness and less intense feelings by fifth graders, even in instances where they understand intrinsic rationales for expectations. The fact that rankings of importance and feelings did not differ by age suggests that across moral, conventional and academic domains older and younger children, in a relative sense, perceive and react similarly to the norms of classroom life. It is the degree of their evaluation and affect both that declines and becomes more consistent over time. (Author/PN)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Working Class Students
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (66th, New York, NY, March 19-23, 1982).