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ERIC Number: ED220468
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Sep-29
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Addressing Teacher Shortages. A Testimony Given to the House Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary and Vocational Education Chaired by Congressman Carl D. Perkins and the House Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education Chaired by Congressman Paul Simon.
Flowers, Anne
The shortage of qualified mathematics and science teachers is a problem likely to grow in the coming decade, reflecting teacher shortages in other subject specialties. In 1981, almost five times more science and mathematics teachers left to take nonteaching jobs than did teachers in other disciplines. Replacements for these teachers are often inadequately qualified. Since shortages exist in other areas, especially in special education, a need is seen for a comprehensive approach to the problem. An emergency or provisional certificate is an inappropriate response, for while arts and science graduates are well prepared in their own fields, they often lack sound training in teaching methods. The proposals to expand the loan forgiveness provisions of the existing National Direct Student Loan program (NDSL), or to create a new program modeled on NDSL for mathematics and science teachers will be successful long range strategies for recruiting prospective teachers. However, there is an immediate need to establish teacher fellowships for qualified students who agree to a minimum commitment as classroom teachers. States and school districts should be encouraged to provide pilot programs which stress cooperation among schools, universities, and industry. There should be sufficient funding for basic and applied research into mathematics, science, education, and technology as they are translated into programs for elementary and secondary school children. In addition, teachers should be offered sabbaticals and stipends to pursue further training, while business, industry, and institutions of higher education should be given incentives, through tax credits or other means, to provide appropriate learning opportunities for teachers. Support systems are needed to provide assistance to new teachers during their critical first years. (JD)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Information Analyses; Legal/Legislative/Regulatory Materials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A