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ERIC Number: ED219909
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Apr
Pages: 130
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Individualized Education Programs--How Much Time Do They Take?
Quinn, Sue Ann
Forty-four teachers enrolled in special education graduate courses were surveyed to find out how much time teachers are spending on the development of individualized education programs (IEPs) and to discover implications regarding instructional time lost in the IEP process. Literature was reviewed on the field of education prior to P.L. 94-142 (the Education for All Handicapped Children Act), the mandates and results of P.L. 94-142, IEP components, procedures to develop and monitor IEPs, the role of the special education teacher, the issue of time, and future research. The questionnaire was designed to gain information on characteristics of the teacher being surveyed, content of the IEPs, time spent on IEP development and writing, and the amount of instructional time devoted to IEP development. Data were analyzed for such areas as the type of teaching position, kind of training, time spent on educational and related services, and preparation for the IEP conference. Major findings included that many teachers are alarmed about the time demands or the overwhelming responsibility when they have little or no help on developing IEPs; that as the years of teaching experience increased, the time to develop IEPs decreased; and that the type of training had no significant effect, although those with no training spent less time on developing IEPs. Appended is a copy of the survey instrument. (SW)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research; Dissertations/Theses - Masters Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Time Utilization
Note: Paper presented at the Annual International Convention of the Council for Exceptional Children (60th, Houston, TX, April 11-16, 1982, Session Th-A4). Master's Thesis, The State University of New York at New Paltz.