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ERIC Number: ED219289
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Nov
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Expression of Emotions through Art: A Phenomenological Approach.
Kasson, Cheryl G.
This paper examines phenomenological approaches to studying expressions of emotions through art. The author begins her discussion by defining the terms in the title. Expressions are controlled, deliberate gestures. Emotions are sensations which involve appraisals of something. Art is something consciously controlled by the artist. The creation of a work of art involves choice and deliberation. A phenomenological approach looks at the "lived experience" (an experience that is conscious and pre-reflective) of expressing emotions through one or more of the arts. The paper then looks at three types of bracketing which David Denton distilled from the phenomenological literature of the past 70 years and shows how each of these categories may be applied to the experience of expressing emotions through the arts. The types of bracketing are: (1) "cognitive" or the conscious, reflective act of setting aside accustomed perceptual sets and interpretive frameworks for the purpose of gaining a clear, new view of the phenomenon; (2) "existential" bracketing in which the fresh perception is occasioned by some interruption in the normal flow of events such as sudden death; and (3) "dramaturgical" bracketing in which forms of art are used to set aside every-dayness, to open new possibilities for perception, judgment, and interpretation. The paper then discusses a phenomenological approach which uses motion pictures to study the vocal and facial expressions of emotion. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of the ethical and methodological considerations for taking a phenomenological approach. (RM)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Phenomenology
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Studies Association (Boston, MA, November 4-7, 1981).