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ERIC Number: ED219264
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982
Pages: 210
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Influence of Religious Background and School Philosophy on Moral Reasoning in Selected Columbus High School Seniors.
Bainer, Deborah Louise
This study attempted to determine if the Judeo-Christian tradition, when part of an individual's religious background and when incorporated into school philosophy, influenced the level of decision-making of high school seniors (N=130) in sociomoral and environmental issues. Subjects, attending four public and private schools in the Columbus (Ohio) area, completed three instruments (included in appendices): (1) Defining Issues Test (DIT), measuring a preference for a particular mode of reasoning in moral issues (based on Kohlberg's moral dilemma series); (2) Environmental Issues Test (EIT), measuring thought patterns and processes using dilemmas set in an environmental rather than general social context; and (3) Student Survey, measuring demographic background information, including educational and religious background. Statistical analysis indicated no significant difference between the level of sociomoral development between public (N=78) and private (N=52) school students. Public school seniors scored significantly higher in environmental-related issues. Religious involvement did not correlate significantly with DIT or EIT. Regression analysis showed EIT P score, science courses, and religious affiliation as significant predictors of DIT P score. Significant predictors of EIT P score were DIT P score, public school attendance, religious affiliation, and female sex. Implications and recommendations are included. (Author/JN)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Dissertations/Theses - Masters Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Environmental Education Research; Environmental Issues
Note: Appendix contains small print. Master's Thesis, Ohio State University.